Information¡@Conference (ACG 11)

¢xAuthor Information ¢xScientific Program¢xInvited Speakers¢xAccepted Papers¢xCall for Papers¢x

¡´ Invited Speakers

Feng-hsiung Hsu (bio)
Senior Researcher
Platforms and Devices Center, Microsoft Research Asia
Title of Invited Speech: Hardware Related Research at Microsoft Research Asia (slides, abstract)

Hiroyuki Iida (bio)
Professor
Department of Information Processing
School of Information Science
Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Title of Invited Speech: Towards Dynamics of Intelligence in the Field of Games (slides, abstract)
T. Anthony Marsland(bio)
Emeritus Professor of Computing Science
University of Alberta
Title of Invited Speech: Trials and Tribulations of a Programmer (slides, abstract)

Title of Invited Speech: Hardware Related Research at Microsoft Research Asia
Feng-hsiung Hsu

Senior Researcher
Platforms and Devices Center, Microsoft Research Asia


Abstract:

An overview of the current hardware related research at Microsoft Research Asia. Subjects discussed include interaction devices that can be used for game control and a PCI FPGA-based hardware prototyping card with up to 13 million programmable gates. The latter will become available to the academic community later and could potentially be used to create a Deep Blue class Chinese chess machine with a single PC, among other things.


Biography:
Author of the book Behind Deep Blue: Building the Computer that Defeated the World Chess Champion, Feng-hsiung Hsu started his graduate work at Carnegie Mellon in the field of computer chess in the year 1985 which eventually culminated in the defeat of the World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov in 1997.
In 1991, the Association for Computing Machinery awarded him a Grace Murray Hopper Award for his work on Deep Blue.
Prior to building the supercomputer Deep Blue that defeated Kasparov, Feng-hsiung Hsu worked on many other chess computers. He started with ChipTest, a simple Chess-playing chip much different than the other Chess playing computer being developed at Carnegie Mellon, Hitech, which was developed by Hans Berliner and included 64 different chess chips. Feng-hsiung Hsu went on to build the successively better Chess playing computers Deep Thought, Deep Thought II, and Deep Blue Prototype.


Title of Invited Speech: Towards Dynamics of Intelligence in the Field of Games
Hiroyuki Iida
Professor
Department of Information Processing
School of Information Science
Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


Abstract:


Just as men long for freedom, the intelligence seeks uncertainty. Games, which epitomize uncertainty, have evolved in their long history to optimize uncertainty refinement. This process concerns a harmony between skill and chance in games, hence, evolutionary changes of noble uncertainty.

Masters who stand on top of their games seek the ultimate harmony that may exist at the end of the changes. Despite their desire to win, masters occasionally exercise their creativity unconditionally without prejudice. We call this state of mind that is commonly found among masters the model of three masters.

The model of three masters¡@reveals three distinct master¡¦s aspects; the master of winning, the master of playing and the master of understanding. They correspond to each of the three aspects that games possess: competitiveness, entertainment and metaphor.

The model of three masters indicates the existence of various interactions between intelligences of players. We explore it in terms of the ¡§dynamics of intelligence in the field of games¡¨.

The model of three masters relates three theories of game: game theory, game-refinement theory and combinatorial game theory. The classical game theory favors no uncertainty, i.e., finding the game-theoretic value or equilibriums. The game-refinement theory recognizes appropriate amount of uncertainty that players may enjoy it. The combinatorial game theory shows in theory the existence of complete uncertainty, i.e., field.    

 

 





Biography:
January 17, 1962: born at Yamagata, Japan
From April 1980 - March 1985: studied Mathematics at the Sophia University of Japan, with specialization in the field of Algebra; graduated in March 1985.
From October 1975 - March 1984: studied Japanese chess (shogi) at the Shoreikai; graduated in March 1984 and promoted to a Grandmaster enrolled. 6-dan GM.
From April 1984 - March 1994: invited in every major tournament of Japanese chess.
From August 1992 - August 1993: continued Ph.D. work at the University of Limburg (Universiteit Maastricht), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Supervised by Prof. dr. H.J. van den Herik.
From April 1991 - March 1994: studied Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan.
March 23, 1994: received the Ph.D. degree after defending a thesis entitled Heuristic Theories on Game-Tree Search. Promotor: Prof.dr. Y. Kotani.
From October 1994 - March 1996: Scientific Researcher in the Science and Technology Agency, Japan.
From April 1996 onwards: Professor at Department of Computer Science in Faculty of Information, and the Chair of Computer Games Research Institute, Shizuoka University, Japan.
From October 2002 onwards: Researcher at PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST).
From April 2005 onwards: Professor at School of Information Science, and the Chair of Research Centre for Computers and Games (RCCG), Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Japan

Since 1994 he has been the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the International Computer Shogi Association (CSA Journal).
He is a founder or co-founder for several academic associations and international conferences such as the Special Issue Group on Games Informatics (SIG-GI) under Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ), the series of Game Programming Workshop, the International Conference on Computers and Games, and the Special Group on Entertainment Computing (SG 16) under International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP).
Since 2000 he has served in the Editorial Board of Journal of International Computer Games Association (ICGA).
Since 2002 he has served as Secretary-Treasurer for the International Computer Games Association (ICGA).
Hiroyuki Iida has been the enthusiastic leader of several programme and organizing committees such as World Computer Shogi Championship (1990 - 2005), Computer Olympiad (2002 - 2005), the GPW '94 (Game Programming Workshop) in Japan, GPW'95, GPW'96, GPW'97, IJCAI-97 Workshop on Computer Games entitled "Using Games as an Experimental Testbed for AI Research" (later published as Games in AI Research), The First International Conference on Computers and Games (CG'98), The Second International Conference on Computers and Games (CG2000), The Third International Conference on Computers and Games (CG2002), and The 10th Advances in Computer Games (ACG-10).
Hiroyuki Iida has received research awards for his distinguished contributions from JSAI (1996), JSSST (1997), CSA (1997 & 2002) and JICAST (1999).




Title of Invited Speech: Trials and Tribulations of a Programmer
T. Anthony Marsland

Emeritus Professor of Computing Science
University of Alberta



Abstract:

It has been more than 50 years since the first chess programs were built. Having lived through this whole period, and having worked on chess program design for a good part of that time, I will reflect on my personal experiences and try to find themes that are relevant to today's game programmers. The time-frame of primary interest is roughly 1970-1995, culminating in the first Deep Blue - Kasparov match. The source materials for this talk were taken from the University of Alberta Archives, supplemented by the university's excellent library of computer games books.

Among the lessons learned are the importance of preserving research materials as your career progresses. Reliance on the latest techniques is important, but rapidly changing technologies can also lead to the complete loss of important data when storage media become obsolete.

Other lessons include the importance of supporting your co-workers research projects, while providing constructive and critical feedback on their written proposals.


Biography:
Tony Marsland received his B.Sc. Honours Degree in Pure and Applied Mathematics from the University of Nottingham (UK, 1958) and M.S.E(E) and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle(USA, 1967). After working one year as an assistant professor he went to AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey for two years as a research scientist, before joining the Computing Science Department at the University of Alberta. He was an ACM National Lecturer during 1979-81 and a McCalla Research Professor in 1985-86. His primary teaching and research interests were in the area of distributed computing systems design. One application for that work was his selective search chess program AWIT.

Aside from his research interests he also had administrative duties, including completing a term as Associate Chair of Computing Science with primary responsibility for the Graduate Program. After helping for many years on NSERC's International Relations Committee, he spent much of the 1994 academic year visiting the University of Hong Kong, where he advised the organisers of the 1995 World Computer Chess Championship. In addition, he was President of the International Computer Chess Association (1992-99). Separately, he has edited two books and written three lengthy encyclopedic articles, as well as co-authoring the usual number of research papers with his former graduate students. Although no longer at the University of Alberta, he maintains an active interest in computing research by serving on Alberta's ICORE internal review committee.