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Journal of Information Science and Engineering, Vol. 32 No. 1, pp. 197-211 (January 2016)


Selective Address Allocator Configuration Protocol (SAACP) for Resource Constrained MANETs*


T. R. RESHMI AND K. MURUGAN
Ramanujan Computing Centre
Anna University
Chennai, 600025 India
E-mail: reshmi.engg@gmail.com; murugan@annauniv.edu

Address autoconfiguration of resource constrained MANETs is a challenging issue for decades. The heterogeneity, multi-interfaces, extreme resource constrains and miniaturization of the nodes participating in multiple networks affects the autoconfiguration schemes. The significant roles of resource utilization caused by multiple communications and its challenges to autoconfiguration have not drawn attention. A cross layer approach called Selective address allocator configuration protocol (SAACP) has been proposed to enhance the service responsiveness and continuity of the autoconfiguration scheme used for resource constrained nodes. The SAACP protocol is a stateful autoconfiguration protocol which selects the address allocator using a weighing algorithm .The algorithm derives weightage for the nodes based on the nodes resource utilization information collected from different layers of network stack. The cost and performance of the proposed scheme has been analyzed using mathematical formulations and simulations respectively. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme reduces address allocation latency, packet losses and protocol overhead and correspondingly increases successful allocation ratio. The scheme proves to perform well even in high resource constraints, node mobility, network merging and partitioning.

Keywords: autoconfiguration, address, cross layer, address allocator, weighing algorithm, MANETs

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Received May 30, 2014; revised August 31, 2014; accepted September 22, 2014.
Communicated by Meng Chang Chen.
* The authors are grateful to the Anna Centenary Research Fellowship (ACRF) grant, for the support to carry out this research project.